8 February 2019

INSANITY- IS YOUR TRAINING GOING NOWHERE?

by Jacob Schepis 0

The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different outcome, by definition- are you insane? Regardless of your goals in the gym, it is evident that you need to progress in some manner in order to achieve such goals. I think we can all agree that one cannot…

The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different outcome, by definition- are you insane?

Regardless of your goals in the gym, it is evident that you need to progress in some manner in order to achieve such goals. I think we can all agree that one cannot continually do the same thing and continually get further results.

Basics of adaptation

Humans are survival beings, our main goal as an organism is to exist and survive, comfortably. If our comfort is disrupted, we respond. If we are cold, we shiver in order to warm up the body’s core temperature. If we are hot we sweat in attempt to cool the skin.

Any stress put on the system will cause a response in some manner. Training, working out, lifting weights is all a stress, it is displacing the system (body) out of it’s comfort zone- disrupting homeostasis.

When a bear attacks a caveman, the caveman must get stronger in order to survive subsequent bear attacks.

If you drink a coffee everyday, you will feel the effects much less than you did when you first started.

If you do 10 push ups everyday, those push ups will feel easier and easier every day.

As human beings we just want to survive and live comfortably, this requires adapting to an initial stress therefore subsequent doses of the same stress will then be seemingly comfortable.

It is for this reason why programming and periodization is vital once you get past a certain stage in one’s lifting career.

Because soon enough you will completely adapt to doing 10 push ups a day, and it will no longer have an effect. Because your body has become use to it, doing 10 push ups a day has now become your baseline, ie. you will no longer get results from it.

The next logical step would be to do 11 push ups a day and let the body adapt to that, then 12, then 13 and so on and so forth. Welcome to progressive overload, one of the key factors of getting results in the gym. In order to get further results, one must progressively overload the stress. Drink more coffee, do more pushups fight more bears.

A problem seen way to often in the fitness industry is people doing the same workouts weekly, monthly and yearly, and wondering why they are getting nowhere. The quintessential culprit of this is boot camp / high intensity style training where there is no quantifiable measures of training. This style of training will probably work for most people in the first 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, but after that, what is next?

Once the body has adapted, and doing 3 boot camp sessions has now become your new base line, because there is no tracking of sets, reps, weight or rest periods there is no progression. So you end up doing the same thing over and over, and expecting a different outcome- you’re insane.

Which begs the question, are you insane?

Is your training progressing in some manner over the weeks, months and years, (and not just the hourly rate), or are you spinning your wheels doing the same 30 minute boot camp twice per week and not building strength, muscle or losing fat.

If the answer is the latter, I strongly suggest you reassess who you are investing your money, time and trust in to take care of your health.

Joshua Cakitaki

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